Shiny, awesome things of interest

Your awesome Tagline

6,818 notes

jtotheizzoe:

The environmental impact of oysters, in one photo
The water in both tanks came from the same source. The one on the right has bivalves. Not only do oysters naturally filter the waters in which they live, they can even protect humans from destructive hurricanes. For more, read about New York’s efforts to bring back oyster populations in the once-toxic Hudson River.
Delicious AND helpful. Who knew?
(photo via Steve Vilnit on Twitter)

jtotheizzoe:

The environmental impact of oysters, in one photo

The water in both tanks came from the same source. The one on the right has bivalves. Not only do oysters naturally filter the waters in which they live, they can even protect humans from destructive hurricanes. For more, read about New York’s efforts to bring back oyster populations in the once-toxic Hudson River.

Delicious AND helpful. Who knew?

(photo via Steve Vilnit on Twitter)

(via tentakrule)

Filed under science

130,137 notes

closettherapist:

trillgamesh:

firefoxshawty:

andrusi:

weeaboobs:

senpaitheking:

That’s not cool Tumblr and you know it, you’re basically forcing people to agree to this bullcrap. 

of course they’re forcing you to agree. if you’re gonna use their services then you have to abide by their rules.

yeah, that’s why it’s called “terms of service”

because they will let you use their service if you agree to their terms

What is the point in forcing you to agree if there is only one option that is so stupid it’s like a presidential election with 1 candidate a complete farce to be honest

Are you guys just not familiar with how websites in general tend to work

"I would like to buy a hamburger."

"Ok, that costs $1."

"I don’t want to pay that."

"Then you can’t have a hamburger."

"Why are you forcing me to agree to this? You’re only giving me one option!"

(via carnivoroussquirrel)

57,485 notes

vixyish:

ellidfics:

cecilyjeanne:

devil-whore-bitch:

They’ve got civilians trapped.

I love that while the avengers fought the aliens you also see them helping to evacuate people so they are safe. It’s not just fighting, it’s rescue as well.

YES THANK YOU! This was my huge and horrible problem with Man of Steel. No help. Buildings falling left and right. I just kept saying “There’s another 10,000 dead people…oooh, and another 10,000 right there!” And no one cared. It left me feeling a bit sick, actually.

In the same movie Captain American *repeatedly* goes out of his way to rescue civilians, order the local police to make sure that the civilians are safe, tells people to get underground in a deleted scene, and leaves the main battle to rescue an entire bank full of terrified people from the Chitauri.  He damn near gets blown to pieces doing the last, after losing his cowl so that the entire world can see his face and realize that the guy in the Captain America outfit is the lost hero from 1945 who sacrificed himself to save the entire Eastern Seaboard.  

Want more?  Don’t forget that Thor offers himself to save an entire town of people he doesn’t even know, and that a couple of years later Jane runs through a library screaming at people to get away from Malekith and his ships as they ravage Greenwich.  And what the Guardians of the Galaxy and the Nova Corps banding together to save an entire planet?  Tony Stark sending his precious armor to save Pepper, then ordering her to remove Maya from the battle zone before thinking of himself?  Bruce Banner going underground to heal people in the most literal sense?  Sharon Carter taking the extra second to kick the launch technician’s chair out from under him just in time to prevent Crossbones from blowing him to hell?  All those poor doomed SHIELD agents trying to take on STRIKE teams with hand guns to prevent those helicarriers from getting intot he air?

Best of all, after spending two years working beside Cap and going on the lam with him, Black Widow, the most morally ambiguous character of them all, shouts “Get out of the way!  RUN!” as she flees for her life from the Winter Soldier.  This is a woman who a worldwide reputation for black ops, and even she puts non-combatants above her own life.

It’s one of the things I love best about Marvel:  their characters are more than muscle and speed and grandstanding against impossible odds.  They have heart and soul and spirit, and every single one of them, without exception, is willing to take the extra second or two to protect the innocent and the defenseless even if it means their own lives.  There’s a moral core there that the Superman of Man of Steel lacks, and it’s a reason why these movies are so popular:

We know in our bones that if we lived in their universe, they’d do what true heroes do, and they’d save us.  

Superman, at least in Man of Steel, doesn’t.  

That makes all the difference.

Also why Christopher Reeve is and will always be my Superman.

(Source: succubuffy, via carnivoroussquirrel)

Filed under marvel

242 notes

fashionsfromhistory:


The Flatiron by Edward J. Steichen
1904, printed 1909 
Steichen added color to the platinum print that forms the foundation of this photograph by using layers of pigment suspended in a light-sensitive solution of gum arabic and potassium bichromate. Together with two variant prints in other colors, also in the Museum’s collection, “The Flatiron” is the quintessential chromatic study of twilight. Clearly indebted in its composition to the Japanese woodcuts that were in vogue at the turn of the century and in its coloristic effect to the “Nocturnes” of Whistler, this picture is a prime example of the conscious effort of photographers in the circle of Alfred Stieglitz to assert the artistic potential of their medium.
Steichen and Stieglitz selected this photograph for inclusion in the “International Exhibition of Pictorial Photography” held at the Albright Art Gallery (now the Albright-Knox Art Gallery) in Buffalo, New York, in 1910. The exhibition of six hundred photographs represented the capstone of Stieglitz’s efforts to promote Pictorialist photography as a fine art.

(MET)

fashionsfromhistory:

The Flatiron by Edward J. Steichen

1904, printed 1909 

Steichen added color to the platinum print that forms the foundation of this photograph by using layers of pigment suspended in a light-sensitive solution of gum arabic and potassium bichromate. Together with two variant prints in other colors, also in the Museum’s collection, “The Flatiron” is the quintessential chromatic study of twilight. Clearly indebted in its composition to the Japanese woodcuts that were in vogue at the turn of the century and in its coloristic effect to the “Nocturnes” of Whistler, this picture is a prime example of the conscious effort of photographers in the circle of Alfred Stieglitz to assert the artistic potential of their medium.
Steichen and Stieglitz selected this photograph for inclusion in the “International Exhibition of Pictorial Photography” held at the Albright Art Gallery (now the Albright-Knox Art Gallery) in Buffalo, New York, in 1910. The exhibition of six hundred photographs represented the capstone of Stieglitz’s efforts to promote Pictorialist photography as a fine art.
(MET)

Filed under art new york city

242 notes

fashionsfromhistory:


The Flatiron by Edward J. Steichen
1904, printed 1909 
Steichen added color to the platinum print that forms the foundation of this photograph by using layers of pigment suspended in a light-sensitive solution of gum arabic and potassium bichromate. Together with two variant prints in other colors, also in the Museum’s collection, “The Flatiron” is the quintessential chromatic study of twilight. Clearly indebted in its composition to the Japanese woodcuts that were in vogue at the turn of the century and in its coloristic effect to the “Nocturnes” of Whistler, this picture is a prime example of the conscious effort of photographers in the circle of Alfred Stieglitz to assert the artistic potential of their medium.
Steichen and Stieglitz selected this photograph for inclusion in the “International Exhibition of Pictorial Photography” held at the Albright Art Gallery (now the Albright-Knox Art Gallery) in Buffalo, New York, in 1910. The exhibition of six hundred photographs represented the capstone of Stieglitz’s efforts to promote Pictorialist photography as a fine art.

(MET)

fashionsfromhistory:

The Flatiron by Edward J. Steichen

1904, printed 1909 

Steichen added color to the platinum print that forms the foundation of this photograph by using layers of pigment suspended in a light-sensitive solution of gum arabic and potassium bichromate. Together with two variant prints in other colors, also in the Museum’s collection, “The Flatiron” is the quintessential chromatic study of twilight. Clearly indebted in its composition to the Japanese woodcuts that were in vogue at the turn of the century and in its coloristic effect to the “Nocturnes” of Whistler, this picture is a prime example of the conscious effort of photographers in the circle of Alfred Stieglitz to assert the artistic potential of their medium.
Steichen and Stieglitz selected this photograph for inclusion in the “International Exhibition of Pictorial Photography” held at the Albright Art Gallery (now the Albright-Knox Art Gallery) in Buffalo, New York, in 1910. The exhibition of six hundred photographs represented the capstone of Stieglitz’s efforts to promote Pictorialist photography as a fine art.
(MET)

Filed under art new york city